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Clinical studies

Scientifically shown to help advance wounds toward healing

SANTYL Ointment plus sharp

Average percentage reduction in ulcer area while applying sharp debridement with or without SANTYL Ointment (2014)

Review study

Integrating SANTYL Ointment between sharp debridements (2017)

Review study
SANTYL Ointment vs mechanical (wet-to-dry)

Efficacy comparison to wet-to-dry + sharp (2013)

Review study
SANTYL Ointment vs autolytic support

Retrospective analysis: efficacy vs medicinal honey (2017)

Review study

Efficacy comparison to hydrogel dressings (2010)

Review study

Integrating SANTYL Ointment between sharp debridements (2017)

Review study
Use of SANTYL Ointment with other wound care products

Testing compatibility with commonly used wound care products (2012)

Review study
Clinical studies

Scientifically shown to help advance wounds toward healing

SANTYL Ointment plus sharp

Average percentage reduction in ulcer area of sharp debridement with or without SANTYL Ointment (2014)

Integrating SANTYL Ointment between sharp debridements (2017)

SANTYL Ointment vs mechanical (wet-to-dry)

Efficacy comparison to wet-to-dry + sharp (2013)

SANTYL Ointment vs autolytic support

Retrospective analysis: efficacy vs medicinal honey (2017)

Efficacy comparison to hydrogel dressings (2010)

Integrating SANTYL Ointment between sharp debridements (2017)

Use of SANTYL Ointment with other wound care products

Testing compatibility with commonly used wound care products (2012)

Average percentage reduction in ulcer area while applying sharp debridement with or without SANTYL Ointment

68%
from baseline
at 6 weeks

SANTYL Ointment + supportive care* + sharp debridement (P<0.001)16†


36%
from baseline
at 6 weeks

Control group: supportive care* + sharp debridement only (P=ns)16†‡

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* Supportive care in the SANTYL Ointment group included ALLEVYN Foam Dressing, cast padding, and Coban™ bandages.

All patients agreed to wear an offloading boot or other appropriate device.

Supportive care in the control group was the clinician's choice.

Mean percent reduction in ulcer area when integrating SANTYL Ointment between sharp debridements

65%
from baseline
at 12 weeks

SANTYL Ointment + supportive care* + sharp debridement (P<0.0001)17


51%
from baseline
at 12 weeks

Control group: hydrogel + supportive care* + sharp debridement (P=0.0001)17

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* Supportive care: all ulcers were covered with a non-adherent foam dressing, changed daily, and given sharp debridement when medically warranted.

All patients agreed to wear an offloading boot or other appropriate device.

Mean percent reduction in ulcer area of SANTYL Ointment vs wet-to-dry + sharp

45%
from baseline at Week 4

SANTYL Ointment (P=0.016)19


0%
from baseline at Week 4

Control group: sharp debridement + wet-to-dry (P=ns)19*

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*ns=not significant

In a retrospective study, pressure ulcers treated with SANTYL Ointment were found to be:

38%

more likely than honey to achieve 100% granulation at one year (P=0.018)15*


47%

more likely than honey to epithelialize at one year (P=0.024)15†

Patients were treated (days of use) for an average of 34.0 days in the SANTYL Ointment group and 33.6 days in the medicinal honey group.15

* Granulation was defined as percentage of the wound bed with granulation tissue formed. One hundred percent granulation was defined as complete debridement of the wound bed.

Epithelialization was defined as a “controlled” or “improved and not worsening” wound bed lacking exudate, with wound area <0.2cm2, and tissue depth <0.1cm.

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Percentage of patients achieving complete debridement in ≤42 days vs hydrogel dressings

85%

SANTYL Ointment20


P<0.003

29%

Hydrogel20

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Testing compatibility with commonly used wound care products

SANTYL Ointment works with many commonly used wound care products21
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What's next?

Patient case studies

Important Safety Information:Use of SANTYL Ointment should be terminated when debridement is complete and granulation tissue is well established.

One case of systemic hypersensitivity has been reported after 1 year of treatment with collagenase and cortisone. Occasional slight transient erythema has been noted in surrounding tissue when applied outside the wound.